Monthly Archives: July 2015

6 Reasons Not to Be Ashamed of Your Frugal Ways

Standard

Our society does a great job of labeling people that are different. Take a look at this great article from Yahoo that discusses the importance of FRUGALITY.

6 Reasons Not to Be Ashamed of Your Frugal Ways

A lot of people cry broke and whine about never having enough cash to get by, yet they’re not always willing to do what it takes to free up cash and save money. Being a frugal person is hard work. And if frugality doesn’t come naturally for you, resisting impulse buys can be a daily struggle, and you may go back-and-forth with whether to spend money on an item.

At the end of the day, a frugal mindset benefits your bottom line. So, while others may make you the butt of their money jokes, here’s why you’ll eventually have the last laugh.

1. This is who you are

We all have different money personalities. Some people are big spenders, whereas others hold onto a dime as if they won’t earn another. To each his own.
Just know that there’s a difference between frugal and cheap. Cheapness can affect the quality of your life, but frugality lets you enjoy the same qualify of life for less. Those who like to spend money might pressure you to loosen the purse strings. But if you’re not bothered by your spending habits, you don’t have to change your ways.

2. You don’t care about keeping up

If you’re committed to being frugal, chances are you don’t feel pressure to keep up with the Joneses or anyone else for that matter. We live in the age of financial peer pressure. This is a big problem in some social circles. If one friend buys a house, then the others are ready to upgrade. If someone wears designer clothes or buys expensive gadgets, then the others have to follow suit. It’s an exhausting cycle that not only reveals an impressionable mind, it keeps people broke.

3. It’s a financial necessity

Others might pressure you to spend money or make comments about your frugal ways. But if you’re frugal out of necessity, there’s no reason to be embarrassed or ashamed, especially since you’re willing to sacrifice more than a lot of people.
When dealing with money problems, some people want to save face, so they don’t make adjustments to their lifestyle. They continue with old habits, even if it further complicates their situation. A frugal person, on the other hand, does whatever it takes to save money so they can keep a roof over their head, food on the table and clothes on their back.

4. You might have a bigger bank account

This isn’t a guarantee, but if you choose not to spend your extra income, you’ll probably have a bigger bank account than those who poke fun at you. So, the next time you feel ashamed or pressure to adjust your frugal mindset, look at your savings account and consider how most Americans don’t have enough in their savings to handle a small emergency.

5. You can reach your goals sooner

You might have a long list of financial goals, but without a lot of extra money, it can take years to fulfill these goals. Being frugal speeds up your progress. If you reduce spending and free up cash in your budget, you’ll have income to pay off debt, save for vacation or prepare for retirement.

6. You’re teaching your kids good money habits

Kids often mimic the money habits of their parents. Remember this the next time you start feeling embarrassed about your frugality. If you’re an irresponsible spender, your children could imitate this behavior in adulthood with long-term financial consequences.

Knowledge is Power by Ed Clark

Standard

The KEY to making a change is knowledge and that knowledge doesn’t have to be complicated it just has to be executed. Take a look at these 4 simple principles and see where you can make a change.

4 Personal Finance Principles to Live by For a Richer Life

Taking control of your personal finances is key to living a more stress-free and stable life — a truly rich existence. All you need to do is take the first step: start becoming more aware of your bank account, and live by these very basic principals that just about sum up what personal finance is all about.

1. Pay yourself first

This is a common personal finance phrase that many people live by. But what does it really mean? No, paying yourself first isn’t buying anything you want and letting your bills collect dust. Basically, it means that before you spend your new paycheck on necessities or wants, you should squirrel away a portion of it to your savings. Getting into this habit is helpful because you’ll learn to prioritize saving, and the steady stream of monthly contributions is the best way to grow your emergency, savings, and retirement accounts. The best and easiest way to pay yourself first is to automate it so that the process is mindless.

2. Live within your means

Don’t spend more than you can afford to spend. Don’t take on loans or debt if you can’t afford it. This even means being cautious on what is generally considered “good” debt. Ever since the financial crisis, all of us had to reassess what we initially thought of as good debt, which includes mortgage, school, and car loans. Once people started getting laid off and defaulting on payments, the good debt very quickly becomes bad. That’s not to say that you shouldn’t go to the college of your dreams; but you should still weigh the costs while keeping in mind realistic expectations of job prospects postgraduation. And if it’s truly worth your investment, you should find ways to cut costs. Other than not taking on debt, conscious spending is also part of what it means to live within your means.

3. Prepare for the long term and the worst

Don’t spend your time living only in the here and now. Think ahead, and start preparing for your retirement and emergencies by starting an emergency fund and contributing to your retirement accounts.

4. Knowledge is king
Keep reading and keep learning about how to better your personal finances. This is just the start of your journey, and there is so much out there to learn